Diekirch - Valkenswaard 2009

Diekirch-Valkenswaard is a 250 km long cycling race, this year we were participating for the 3rd time. Last year we had finished in a nice time and we hoped to do better this year. We took the bus from Valkenswaard, in the Netherlands, to Diekirch, in Luxembourg. 

 

At 1:00 at night we were given some food and started waiting until our bikes could be loaded in a truck. As soon as we entered the bus a man said, without saying hi or anything else, 'Boys, this cold is going to impact your legs tomorrow'. We reclined our chairs and tried to get as much rest as possible. The bus ride went smooth and we arrived in Diekirch around 5:00. There was no-one else there yet. Our bikes had been loaded first, so they were taken out of the truck last. Next year that would be something we should improve.

 

As soon as we had our bikes we headed to the start. It was about 6 o'clock. There were only 20 people in front of us. The man behind us had ridden the first 150 km with us last year. It was very could and still dark. After having a moment of silence for someone who's name we couldn't hear we were on our way. There were again many people who left without waiting for their first stamp. During the first 40 kilometers we over took more people than officially had started before us.

 

Last year it was pretty warm after the first hour, now it stayed cold. We were in a fast group right from the start. One of them kept cycling in pole position. He kept asking us to do the same, but then would overtake us 30 seconds later. At the Thommersberg everyone cycled uphill in about the same pace, except me because I didn't have such a small gear. I went twice as fast but probably also got twice as tired.

 

At the first checkpoint we quickly got our stamp and a slice of orange. The hills continued, there were many sections that we still recognized from the last two years. That helped a lot at some occasions. Bart's parents were at the second checkpoint and followed us from there on. 

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The second checkpoint

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The second checkpoint

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Refilling our water bottles


We slowly descended until the rest of the group caught up with us. It became less hilly and we took a wrong turn at some point. Back on the right route we mostly passed small villages. Bart and I did most of the work, riding up front.

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diekirch valkenswaard

The group we were in


After I had ridden in pole position for a few kilometers Bart took over for a while. Besides one other cyclist nobody else wanted to go up front. Bart got angry so told them they were lazy idiots and cycled off. I knew that if I would follow him the rest would just follow me and nothing would change. That's why I held back until the other people started putting in some effort to catch up with Bart. In Visé we crossed the river.

diekirch valkenswaard
diekirch valkenswaard
diekirch valkenswaard

At the 3rd checkpoint we again stopped very briefly. We had left the large group. Together with someone in a Cervélo shirt we rode ahead of the rest. After a while the group caught up with us. By then it was time for the notorious Hallembaye hill. We could remember climbing a steep hill on our way back from our cycling vacation to the south of France. That turned out the same one. Bart and were used to climbing the large hills in south Europe, so even though it was steep, the 900 long climb was didn't feel too tough.

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The Hallembaye

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Climbing the Hallembaye

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We looked back and noticed we were pretty far ahead of the rest of the group. We didn't consider yet to continue by ourselves. After a kilometer the Cervélo man joined us. The rest of the group was still nowhere to be seen. 

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Descending the Hallembaye

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De Cervélo man caught up with us

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The three of us kept alternating cycling in pole position. The terrain kept getting less hilly. It would be really nice if we would be able to finish together. Around the time we reached Belgium we overtook another man in a black cycling shirt. He had been with us in the beginning, but had apparently cycled alone for the last 70 kilometers. He was tired but did his fare share of work.

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Our group of three

diekirch valkenswaard
diekirch valkenswaard
diekirch valkenswaard
diekirch valkenswaard

The cyclist in the black shirt

 

I had successfully tried to 'empty my bladder' while going downhill. Bart want to try as well, as we didn't have time to stop. Just when he was ready to start his mom and dad drove by to take a picture. Only then we realized they had been behind us all along. His mom told us they had thought I was sitting on my bike rather odd. I was glad I hadn't peed all over their windshield.

 

It was about 20 kilometer until the last checkpoint before the finish. We didn't expect the big group to catch up with us, as we had consistently been the fasted three cyclists. Suddenly four cyclists passed as and the big group was right behind them. The four cyclist weren't part of the race at all, but from the same club as many people in the large group. They had just been waiting to help their friends out during the last 50 km. As Diekirch-Valkenswaard is officially not a race this was not illegal, but it certainly felt like cheating. They were also really annoying as they were constantly shouting about nothing and almost took a wrong turn. They also used a bunch of made up hand signs. One started waving his finger in loops, which we interpreted as them wanting us to continue rotating in pole position. As a result we sped up and tried to get in front. Apparently the signal meant 'stop a car is coming', so we were nearly driven of our bikes. We were really pissed. We knew about a shortcut over a grassy field to reach the last checkpoint. By not telling the rest we managed to get back in front. Without taking any food we quickly continued.

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The last checkpoint
 

We cycled as fast as we could for the last 25 km. After 5 km the larger group still caught up to us. Fortunately the fake contestants went away a few kilometer before the finish so we quickly were near the front again. There was still one fake cyclists trying to help his friend. Bart was really angry and asked him if his bib number had fallen of. At first he pretended like he didn't hear him so Bart shouted it again. The man said he didn't have any, but still didn't go away.

 

The last kilometers we just tried to stay in front. I was really angry which helped me to cycle fast. In the last hundred meters Bart pushed out a final effort and caught up with me. Eventually we finished ahead of the rest of the group, in 17th and 18th place overall. Even better than last year.

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At the finish

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Me at the finish

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Quickly getting the last stamp

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Running quickly over the stage


We each got a medal. At the back of the bar we met everyone we had been cycling with. The man with the orange ribbon on his helmet, the Cervélo shirt guy and a few others. My parents gave us roses and so did Bart's girlfriend. Then it was time for a cold beer.

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Me in the bar where we received our medals

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Bart

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Behind the bar

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Bart was half dead

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The medal

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We were still able to smile


We had finished at 15:03, in 17th and 18th place. Last year we were 24th and 26th, then we had finished at 15:05.

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 Time of arrival plotted against the number of participants, we are indicated with red lines